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"It is clear that the chief end of mathematical study must be to make the students think."—John Wesley

 

 

 

 

 

01-15-18

to

 01-19-18

 

Hello, students and parents!

 

This is the 18th week of school and the 2nd week of 3rd 9-weeks grading period.

 

A reminder that if any student is absent, they are expected to watch the video of that day’s lecture, found in the shared google folder, so that they are up to speed when they return. 

 

This MONDAY, January 15th, is a school holiday because of an unused Bad Weather Day, which will allow everyone to celebrate MLK Day.

 

 

quote of the week

 1-19-Martin-Luther-King-ftr

 

 

 

“Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

 

 —Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

AP Exam registration will open on Tuesday, January 16th at 8:00am.  The cost of each exam is $96.  If students are on free and reduced lunch, the cost of each exam will be $45.  I will have a link put on the website(s) so students can register on-line through Total Registration.  All registration and payments will be made on-line.  If a student needs to write a check, they can print an invoice and mail their check to Total Registration.  There will be instructions on how to do this during the registration process.  Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Registration will close on March 2, 2018 at 11:59 PM.  This is earlier than usual because AP booklets will come PRE-CODED this year, eliminating the “Bubbling Sessions” previously required.  It is imperative that you enter accurate information when registering on-line because this is the information that will be used to print your answer documents.  Also, please make sure to include your student ID number so that it will be easier to access your scores in July.  

 

https://user.totalregistration.net/AP/445055

 


 

This week in the classroom . . .

(All chapter headings are from Korpi’s online curriculum, found at www.korpisworld.com)

PreAP Precal

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Enjoy MLK/Bad Weather Day

Activity/Lessons:

Smile

Check for Understanding

Be Happy

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Apply angles and angle measures to situations

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 5.2

Check for Understanding

WS 5.2

 

WEDNESDAY, JANURAY 17, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Apply angles and angle measures to situations

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 5.2

Check for Understanding

WS 5.2

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Apply angles and angle measures to situations

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 5.2

Check for Understanding

WS 5.2

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Graph circular trigonometric functions  

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 5.3

Check for Understanding

WS 5.3

 

 

AP Calculus AB

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Enjoy MLK/Bad Weather Day

Activity/Lessons:

Smile

Check for Understanding

Be Happy

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Approximate functions using tangent lines

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 3.7

Check for Understanding

WS 3.7

 

WEDNESDAY, JANURAY 17, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Find the rate of change of related quantities

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 3.8

Check for Understanding

WS 3.8

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Find the rate of change of related quantities

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 3.8

Check for Understanding

WS 3.8

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Find the rate of change of related quantities

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 3.8

Check for Understanding

WS 3.8

 

 

AP Calculus BC

MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Enjoy MLK/Bad Weather Day

Activity/Lessons:

Smile

Check for Understanding

Be Happy

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 4.4

Check for Understanding

WS 4.4

 

WEDNESDAY, JANURAY 17, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 4.4

Check for Understanding

WS 4.4

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 4.4

Check for Understanding

WS 4.4

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018

Content Objective:

TOOTLIFTST: Solve separable differential equations

Activity/Lessons:

NOTES 5.1

Check for Understanding

WS 5.1

 

 

 

 

This week on campus . . .

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Monday, January 15, 2018

Happy MLK Day!

No School!

 

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Happy National Fig Newton Day!

7:00 - Boys Basketball vs. Clemens (home)

7:00 - Girls Basketball vs. Clemens (away)

7:00 - Boys Soccer vs. Central Catholic (away)

 

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Happy Ben Franklin Day!

ADVISORY SCHEDULE FOR RACHEL’S CHALLENGE

4:00 - HOSA meeting in library

7:00 - Girls Soccer vs. Johnson (away)

 

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Happy Thesaurus Day!

Girls JV Soccer at Smithson Valley Tournament

Girls Golf in Marble Falls

Seniors order caps/gowns/announcements during lunches

8:15 - Faculty Meeting in auditorium (professional staff)

4:00 - Faculty Meeting in auditorium (professional staff)

4:00 - FCCLA Meeting in library

6:30 - Wrestling vs. Smithson Valley (home)

 

Friday, Januaray 19, 2018

Happy National Popcorn Day!

Girls JV Soccer at Smithson Valley Tournament

Girls Golf in Marble Falls

Seniors order caps/gowns/announcements during lunches

5:00 - Wrestling at Bill Gillespie Classic (away)

7:00 - Boys Basketball vs. Smithson Valley (away)

7:00 - Girls Basketball vs. Smithson Valley (home)

7:00 - Boys Soccer vs. Madison (home)

 

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Happy Penguin Awareness Day!

Girls JV Soccer at Smithson Valley Tournament

Girls Golf in Marble Falls

9:00 - Wrestling at Bill Gillespie Classic (away)

10:00 - Boys JVB Soccer vs. Reagan (home)

 

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Happy National Hugging Day!

 

 

NBHS Athletics Calendar

 

 

This week on the Math Playground . . . 

 

MATH BIO:

Enrico Fermi (1901 – 1954) was an Italian physicist, particularly remembered for his work on the development of the first nuclear reactor, and for his contributions to the development of quantum theory, nuclear and particle physics, and statistical mechanics.  Awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1938 for his work on induced radioactivity, Fermi is widely regarded as one of the leading scientists of the 20th century, highly accomplished in both theory and experiment.  Fermium, a synthetic element created in 1952, the Fermi National Accelerator Lab, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and a type of particles called fermions are named after him.

 

MATH FACT:

In science, particularly in physics or engineering education, a Fermi problem, Fermi question, or Fermi estimate is an estimation problem designed to teach dimensional analysis, approximation, and the importance of clearly identifying one's assumptions.  Named after Enrico Fermi, such problems typically involve making justified guesses about quantities that seem impossible to compute given limited available information.

 

Fermi was known for his ability to make good approximate calculations with little or no actual data, hence the name. One example is his estimate of the strength of the atomic bomb detonated at the Trinity test, based on the distance traveled by pieces of paper dropped from his hand during the blast.  Fermi's estimate of 10 kilotons of TNT was remarkably close to the now-accepted value of around 20 kilotons, a difference of less than one order of magnitude (power of ten).

The classic Fermi problem, generally attributed to Fermi, is "How many piano tuners are there in Chicago?" A typical solution to this problem would involve multiplying together a series of estimates that would yield the correct answer if the estimates were correct. For example, we might make the following assumptions:

  1. There are approximately 5,000,000 people living in Chicago.
  2. On average, there are two persons in each household in Chicago.
  3. Roughly one household in twenty has a piano that is tuned regularly.
  4. Pianos that are tuned regularly are tuned on average about once per year.
  5. It takes a piano tuner about two hours to tune a piano, including travel time.
  6. Each piano tuner works eight hours in a day, five days in a week, and 50 weeks in a year.

From these assumptions we can compute that the number of piano tunings in a single year in Chicago is

(5,000,000 persons in Chicago) / (2 persons/household) × (1 piano/20 households) × (1 piano tuning per piano per year) = 125,000 piano tunings per year in Chicago.

We can similarly calculate that the average piano tuner performs

(50 weeks/year)×(5 days/week)×(8 hours/day)/(1 piano tuning per 2 hours per piano tuner) = 1000 piano tunings per year per piano tuner.

Dividing gives

(125,000 piano tuning per year in Chicago) / (1000 piano tunings per year per piano tuner) = 125 piano tuners in Chicago.

A famous example of a Fermi-problem-like estimate is the Drake equation, which seeks to estimate the number of intelligent civilizations in the galaxy. The basic question of why, if there are a significant number of such civilizations, ours has never encountered any others is called the Fermi paradox.

MATH QUOTE: 

Before I came here I was confused about this subject. Having listened to your lecture I am still confused. But on a higher level.—Enrico Fermi

 

If Fermi had been born a few years earlier, one could well imagine him discovering Rutherford's atomic nucleus, and then developing Bohr's theory of the hydrogen atom. If this sounds like hyperbole, anything about Fermi is likely to sound like hyperbole.—C.P. Snow

 

LIMERICK:

This limerick is about Fermi estimating things to powers of 10.

 

How Fermi could estimate things!
Like the well-known Olympic ten rings,
And the one-hundred states,
And weeks with ten dates,
And birds that all fly with one... wings.

 

Have a great week,

 

Kevin W. Korpi

 

New Braunfels High School

www.korpisworld.com

kkorpi@nbisd.org

 

 

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Mathematics is not a careful march down a well-cleared highway, but a journey into a strange wilderness, where the explorers often get lost. Rigour should be a signal to the historian that the maps have been made, and the real explorers have gone elsewhere.--W.S. Anglin

 

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Caricatures done by Thomas Korpi

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